Harborside Veterinary Hospital

Hours of Operation:

Mon, Wed, Fri
8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tue, Thu*
8:00 am - 6:00 pm

Sat
8:00 am - 12:00 pm

*Some exceptions allowed for appointments to 8pm.
Call for up to date hours.

Surgical Care

Harborside Veterinary Hospital Surgical Care

Dr. James Frevola and the veterinarians at Harborside Veterinary Hospital are ready to provide the finest surgical care for your pet. Our hospital is equipped for most major surgical procedures, including common soft-tissue surgeries such as spay/neuter procedures, tumor removals and total ear canal ablation.

Prior to surgery, each patient receives a thorough physical examination to identify any existing medical conditions that might endanger their health. Because not all problems can be detected on examination, all surgery patients undergo pre-anesthetic blood and urine testing. These tests give us a more complete picture of your pet's health and allow us to tailor an anesthetic regimen that is specific for your pet. All surgical patients, including those undergoing routine procedures such as spay/neuter surgeries, receive pain control medications. We urge you to discuss pain management options with our staff.

Orthopedic Surgery

Dr. Frevola has many years experience performing complicated orthopedic surgeries. He has received continuing education certifications in small animal fracture management (basic and advanced), Imex external fixation and in other areas. Common orthopedic procedures performed at Harborside Veterinary Hospital include:

  • Cruciate repair: The cruciate ligaments connect the thigh bone (distal femur) to the shin bone (proximal tibia). The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments are found in the knee joint of dogs and cats. Ruptures of these ligaments most commonly occur in overweight, middle - and older-aged dogs. If left untreated, a torn anterior cruciate ligament can lead to degenerative joint disease or meniscal injuries. Cruciate repair surgery often involves replacing the ligament with artificial material designed to take over function of the anterior cruciate ligament.
  • Bone plating: Treating a broken limb in a dog or cat is vastly different from treating a broken limb in a human. Placing and maintaining casts on a dog or cat are very difficult and present many challenges to both veterinarians and pet owners. To better heal a broken bone, we may perform plating surgery. This involves the application of various metal surgical implants, such as pins, wires, plates and screws, to the broken limb. The implants restore a broken bone by holding them in place while healing occurs.

Cancer Treatment

Thanks to recent advances in veterinary medicine, cancer treatments for pets are highly effective and many pets diagnosed with cancer can successfully beat the disease and lead healthy, happy lives. Harborside Veterinary Hospital utilizes both surgery and chemotherapy to treat cancer in pets. Many of the secondary effects associated with chemotherapy for humans are not experienced by pets.